Archive | Firearms

CANADA’S FIREARMS ADVISORY COMMITTEE: THE SCORECARD.

The purpose of the committee is to advise the Minister of Public Safety on pragmatic measures to reform Canada’s firearms policies, laws and regulations to ensure a modernized firearms regime that will keep Canadians safe and safeguard their rights and freedoms in an open and democratic society.

The Committee will consist of up to 15 members. It will include individuals who are civilian firearms users, knowledgeable law enforcement officers, public health advocates, representatives from women’s groups, and members of the legal community.

The National Firearms Association and the Canadian Shooting Sports Association feels that, once again, there is no one from the shooting community who truly represents civilian firearms users with the latest round of appointments. Continue Reading →

What about those prohibited handguns?

We get quite a few questions from our older members who are licensed (or grandfathered) to own what is known as 12-6 handguns, defined as ‘s.12(6): handguns with a barrel length of 105 mm or less or that discharge .25 or .32 calibre ammunition. On licences issued on or after April 10, 2005, these firearms will be referred to as 12(6.1) firearms’. Their question is whether or not they can get these handguns transferred into their children’s name even though their children are not licensed to have them. Continue Reading →

United Nations Firearms Marking System

One of the Liberal Party’s Firearms Policies.

One of the firearms policies that the liberals announced in their elections platform was to ‘Immediately implement the imported gun marking regulations that have been repeatedly delayed by Stephen Harper’.

Most of us have heard lots of rumours as to exactly what these regulations are and how they will effect law abiding gun owners.  The Canadian Shooting Sports Association (CSSA) has done an analysis of the effects of these regulations. CSSA states that there will be an enormous cost involved in complying with these regulations and in order to stay in business this enormous cost can only be absorbed by being passed on to the consumer, and the cost of a new firearm in Canada will skyrocket, perhaps more than $200 per firearm in the first five years, per CSAAA (Canada’s industry organization) estimates.  This is the average cost applicable to any firearm regardless of retail price.  It also makes the assumption that the importer can withstand the astronomical set up costs and is still in business.

If you are interested read the full article and draw your own conclusions.